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Academic Divisions

About the Curriculum

Antioch College recognizes that the future is intersectional, and that many disciplines and skills will need to be blended in creating solutions. In the College’s new curriculum, students design their own pathways to the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees. In their second year, Antioch students enroll in a Design Your Degree course, which helps them articulate their program vision, goals and course lists. Student degree plans can be focused around a single theme, or as multi-disciplinary as our courses and our faculty. All Antioch students participate in the College's signature Cooperative Education program, which includes periods of full-time work, research, or other off-campus experiential opportunities.  

The college supports students pursuing degrees in the primary disciplines in which faculty have expertise.

Antioch faculty members regularly offer courses in the following areas:

  • Africana Studies
  • Analytical Writing
  • Anatomy
  • Asian American History
  • Asian and Asian American History
  • Borders & Borderlands
  • Biology
  • Botany
  • Chemistry
  • Cities, People, Institutions
  • Comic Arts
  • Community Organization and Advocacy
  • Comparative Philosophy
  • Creative Practice
  • Creative Writing
  • Drawing
  • Eastern Philosophy
  • Ecology
  • English Language and Literature
  • Environmental Science
  • Evolution
  • Expository Writing
  • French Language and Culture
  • Gender and Sexuality
  • General Biology
  • Genetics
  • History
  • Japanese Language and Culture
  • Language and Culture
  • Latin American History
  • Literature
  • LGBTQ Studies
  • Literary Theory
  • Literature and History
  • Literature and Social Justice
  • Mathematics
  • Media Arts
  • Molecular Cell Biology
  • Natural History
  • New Media
  • Organismal Biology
  • Painting
  • Performance
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Physiology
  • Political Economy
  • Postcolonial Studies
  • Printmaking
  • Psychology
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Statistics
  • Sculpture
  • Spanish Language and Culture
  • Sustainability
  • U.S. History
  • Visual Arts
  • Western Law and Justice
  • Work and Workplace Skills
  • World History
  • Writing
  • Yoga Teacher Training

Students focus their degrees either disciplinarily or interdisciplinary around an area of inquiry. With advice of the faculty, they choose the specific courses they will take to meet their individual academic interests and needs.

Another hallmark of the Antioch College experience is its emphasis on the Areas of Practice. These areas -- 1) Environmental Sustainability; 2) Deliberative Democracy, Diversity, and Social Justice; 3) Creativity and Story; 4) Wellbeing; and  5) Work, World, and Resilient Community -- define domains of creative and critical praxis in which faculty, staff, and students are already engaged. Beyond Cooperative Education, this means the new curriculum will honor educational experiences through 91.3 WYSO, Antioch's NPR-affiliated radio station; Antioch's Glen Helen Ecology Institute; the Wellness Center; the Antioch Farm; The Antioch Review; and the Coretta Scott King Center for Cultural and Intellectual Freedom.  

 

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Degree Requirements

 

To earn the bachelor’s degree at Antioch College, students fulfill the following distribution requirements.

Curricular Area

Credits

General Education

54

Major

48 (B.A. or B.S.)

Language and Culture

12

Cooperative Education

36

Electives

30

Sustainability

One course; credited above

 

180 Credits

The Language and Culture requirement is proficiency-based; students take as many or as few credits as needed to obtain the requisite oral proficiency. Any additional credits needed come from electives; any unused credits are added to electives. On average, a student with no background in a foreign language can expect to need 12 credits of instruction.

Cooperative Education: Students entering in the first or second year must complete at least three (3) Cooperative Education experiences. Third-year transfer students complete one (1) Cooperative Education experience.

 

Self-Designed Major

 

All students will have a self-designed major leading to either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree.

Bachelor of Arts Distribution Requirements

Curricular Area

Credits

100-200 level courses

12

300-400 level courses

12

Methods or related preparation course

4

CAP 394 Capstone Project Preparation

4

CAP 495 Capstone Project

4

Electives (which could be a 12-credit major-related co-op, additional coursework, etc.)

12

 

48 credits

Bachelor of Science Distribution Requirements

Curricular Area

Credits

100-200 level courses (including 4 credits of appropriate science or social science and 4 credits of appropriate mathematics)

12

300-400 level courses (including 8 credits of appropriate math, science, or social science)

12

Methods or related preparation course

4

CAP 394 Capstone Project Preparation

4

CAP 495 Capstone Project

4

CAP 450 Project Development

4-8

Electives (which could be a 12-credit major-related co-op, additional coursework, etc.)

4-8

 

48 credits

In addition to taking major-related courses and meeting regularly with advisors, students will also develop the following:

Self-designed Major Title: Each student’s transcript will identify the disciplinary, interdisciplinary, or transdisciplinary areas that are the focus of a student’s degree plan. The major title appears on the transcript as “Self-Designed Major: (subtitle)” and must be approved by the faculty.

Subtitles may be general or more specific. Some examples include:

  • Agricultural Textile Science
  • Applied Mathematics and Economic Analysis
  • Biosocial Innovation
  • Contemporary Performance
  • Creative Writing and Literature
  • Arts and Environmental Science
  • Intercultural Political Engagement
  • Liberation Studies
  • Political Economy and Communications
  • Psychology

 

Statement of Inquiry: Explanation of student’s self-determined educational path. The statement summarizes what the student has investigated and includes an exposition of the questions or issues the student explored during their time at Antioch College. Students develop the Statement of Inquiry in their second year, and revise it periodically throughout their education.

Title of Capstone Project: All students earning the BA or BS degree complete a capstone project in their final year of study. The Capstone Project gives Antioch students the opportunity to pull together the knowledge and methods of inquiry achieved during their studies into a cohesive, informed, final presentation. The project can take the form of a thesis, paper based on original scientific research, public presentation of students artistic concentration, or project highlighting an important topic in the student’s field of study. The Capstone Project Title is included on the transcript.

 

Cooperative Education

Cooperative Education remains a central component of Antioch’s curriculum. Through Co-op, students spend at least 25 percent, and up to 33 percent, of their undergraduate education engaged in the kinds of full-time work, research, or self-directed enterprises that have earned Antioch students an international reputation for creativity, industriousness, and ingenuity . During co-operative education terms (listed as "work" in the table below), students earn 12 academic credits for their experiential education as they work full-time.

Study/Work Sequence
The following study/work sequence is assumed for most students. Depending on a student’s self-determined self-designed major, there may be variations in the sequence, which may include a fourth cooperative education experience.

 

Fall

Winter

Spring

Year 1

Study

Study

Work

Year 2

Study

Work

Study

Year 3

Study

Study

Study

Year 4

Work

Study

Study

Countries in which students have completed Co-op assignments:

  • Argentina
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Bahamas
  • Belgium
  • Belize
  • Bolivia
  • Canada
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Costa Rica
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Ecuador
  • Ethiopia
  • France
  • Germany
  • Ghana
  • Guatemala
  • India
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Mexico
  • Nepal
  • New Zealand
  • Nicaragua
  • Peru
  • Senegal
  • Spain
  • St. Vincent
  • Thailand
  • United Kingdom
  • United States

 

 

General Education

 

The foundation for the Antioch College experience is set in the General Education curriculum. While students design degree plans unique to their passions, goals, and needs, all students who enter Antioch as first-year students will share a similar academic experience, which includes coursework in core disciplinary areas as well as seminars in interdisciplinarity, dialogues across difference, and cooperative education.

Curricular Area

Credits

Arts

4

Humanities

4

Sciences

4

Social Sciences

4

English Composition

4

Expository Writing

4

Quantitative

4

Dialogue Across Difference

4

Gender and Sexuality

4

Race and Ethnicity

4

Antioch Commons

4

Antioch Seminar

3

Cooperative Education Prep

2

Senior Reflection Paper

2

Design Your Degree

3

 

54 credits

 

Common First-Year Courses

 

  • ANTC 101, Antioch Commons (4 credits)

    The Antioch Commons is a catalyst for unconventional thinking, interdisciplinary inquiry, and unexpected discoveries across the arts, humanities, sciences, and social sciences. It is a space, both physically and conceptually for dialogue across specializations and perspectives about issues of importance. In the Antioch Commons students involve themselves in the governing bodies and processes of the college and gain an understanding of the opportunities for service and avenues for change in the college community. Students develop tools and strategies to find information and media and to understand the role they play in academic dialog and discourse. Prerequisite: None.

  • ANTC 102, Dialogue Across Difference (4 credits)

    This course is designed to give students an introduction to the history, theory, and practice behind effective intercultural dialogue and an opportunity to practice skills associated with dialogue across difference, recognizing a multiplicity of viewpoints and engaging different ideological perspectives. In addition to issues of race, we will develop frameworks for considering class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and national origin. We will engage the many intersecting identities that make interactions between people from different groups difficult and potentially volatile. We hope to encourage and engage a multiplicity of viewpoints within the course readings and discussion. Materials for the course will include books, articles, blogs, videos, and other online resources. Weekly reflections on the materials assigned as well as practice logs tracking use of skills outside of class will support student learning. The course will be highly participatory and practice-driven. Prerequisite: None.

  • ENG 105, English Composition (4 credits)

    This course seeks to improve writing for academic purposes. Particular attention will be paid to avoiding plagiarism, documentation styles and the use of secondary sources, close reading and annotating, critical and textual analysis, the development of argumentative essays, and adherence to Standard English writing conventions. Assignments will include the examination of texts on writing craft, review and analysis of published texts in various styles and genres, peer review, and writing and revising original works. Prerequisite: Placement by writing placement exam.

  • ENG 251, Expository Writing (4 credits)

    This course is a genre-specific course that allows students to focus more intently on specific research techniques and to build skills in composing creative and critical non-fiction prose. Students will read established writers and write original compositions in a number of genres and styles. Individual courses may focus on essay writing; news, feature, and editorial writing, scholarly personal narrative; writing about specific subjects; or writing within specific academic disciplines. This course may be taken more than once as long as the course title and description are distinct. Prerequisite: ENG 105. Students may also register for this course if the prerequisite has been satisfied through appropriate scores (ACT or SAT), AP exams, or transfer credit.

  • EXPR 145, Foundations of Community Action: Preparation for Cooperative Education (2 credits)

    This is a campus-based course that will lead students to effectively engage with organizations and develop the skills necessary to participate fully in the Cooperative Education Program. Focusing on the theme of community action, students are introduced to key concepts of participatory practice that provide a foundation for their life at Antioch College and prepare them for the world of work. In addition to practical skills such as resume writing and interview techniques, students examine the practices of building sustainable relationships across difference, identifying shared purpose, and forging pathways for collective action.

    The course makes full use of campus assets by positioning students within a connective web of partner organizations that enables them to develop an understanding of the principles of community-based inquiry and place-based experiential learning. We examine local efforts toward social, economic, and environmental justice as well as how to engage in such work in meaningful, respectful, and reflexive ways. Case studies afforded by our proximity to various local nonprofit organizations enables class members to consider best practices in organizational effectiveness and to learn about the challenges of community work. The overall goal of the course is to prepare students to become integrative thinkers, ambitious collaborators, and effective change makers through their engagement both on and off-campus over Co-op.

 

 

Language and Culture

At Antioch, we believe the victories for humanity we seek require us to reach beyond ourselves and engage with others for global solutions. We've crafted a language and culture requirement that is proficiency based, not credit based. This means that each student must demonstrate that they can can communicate and cooperate with others in a second language.

Showing native speakers of another language that you can build on common ground with them and that you care about what's important to them is a necessary step to working for a better world. This also improves skills of cultural awareness, communication, and engagement that will be useful to you wherever you might be.

Antioch College currently offers study opportunities in French, Japanese, and Spanish. All students are required, at a minimum, to achieve Novice-High oral proficiency in the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) in a second language.

Students also have the option of pursuing more advanced language learning leading to a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with a language focus. This program of study includes the completion of one language immersion Cooperative Education experience abroad.

 

 

Questions? Contact the Office of Admissions at admission@antiochcollege.edu or 937-319-6082.