You are here

Course Descriptions

WORK 125T Work Portfolio for Transfer Students (2 credits)

Offered as needed, generally in the Fall Quarter; Prerequisites: Permission of the Co-op faculty

The Work Portfolio for Transfer Students course focuses on reading, journal writing, and reflection activities that relate developing knowledge and skills to their recent employment. Here, students begin to develop knowledge and skills that allow for thoughtful reflection of their experiences on the job and in their community. In this work portfolio, these skills include purposeful remembering and reflection. Students are introduced to journal writing and experiential education theories. Organized reflective writing and other learning activities are designed to help students understand their trajectory towards achieving the stated co-op learning outcomes. These assignments foster a deeper awareness of working productively as a successful employee, and understanding organizational structure while reflecting on the co-op job. In the final paper students present an in-depth self-assessment of growth in the integration of classroom learning and its application to the experience of the workplace, and analysis of further needs for development.

WORK 145 Co-op Preparation I (1 credit)

Offered once per year in the Fall Quarter; Prerequisites: none; This is a required course for all students that generates open elective credit

This is a campus-based course that leads students through the process of securing their first co-op jobs. Students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to create innovative resumes, write engaging cover letters, practice interview skills, and develop strategies for success in the workplace. They engage in observational exercises and are introduced to contemporary employment trends. Course requirements include the completion of a module on academic honesty, the creation of a resume, development of cover letter (and/or self-designed proposal), the submission of a co-op interests form, and various other assignments.

WORK 150 Work Portfolio I (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Spring Quarter; Prerequisites: None; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

This introductory Work Portfolio course is designed to help students more deeply consider their individual experience as an Antioch co-op student, encouraging them to become more articulate about their relationship to working and how it impacts learning. The readings and assignments in this course ask students to consider the historic idea of cooperative learning, to reinterpret the Antioch adventure of experiential education, and to forge their own contemporary and personally meaningful experience as they identify your goals and realize their sense of agency.

WORK 250 Work Portfolio II (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Winter Quarter; Prerequisites: Permission of the Co-op faculty; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

Welcome to the world of work in the early 21st Century. Students find themselves entering a global talent market shaped by massive demographic, economic, linguistic, and digital disruptions that are challenging long-held assumptions about nearly every aspect of modern life. They sense that they must develop different skills and capacities than those of previous generations in order to lead lives of significance and service in this emerging world. In addition to the deep content knowledge that has always been central to Antioch’s liberal arts approach, employers underscore the need to develop robust collaborative, communicative, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary capacities in order to collect data, communicate ideas, and test proposed solutions to problems in the workplace. This Work Portfolio course is designed to help students understand themselves as a "free agents" that are able to navigate the emerging employment landscape and develop the instincts necessary for productive engagement with people and organizations beyond the protected walls of higher education. The course engages students in purposeful observation, journal writing/blogging, auto-ethnographic observation, reflection exercises, reading, and discussion forums designed to help them develop a considered relationship with your employer and the community they serve. It is intended to help students learn more about themselves, consider how they move through the world, and reflect on how their experience relates to their life goals.

WORK 311 Art of Social Engagement and Participatory Practice (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Fall Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least one prior Work Portfolio course at the 100/200-level or instructors permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

Within this course, students explore some of the guiding principles of socially engaged art and performance as well as case studies of public art and community-based participatory practice. Inviting inquiry and reflection on the ethical dimensions of art as cultural development, students examine how principles of partnership, reciprocity, diversity and dialogue can lead to socially transformative art. Through this lens, students engage in their own arts/performance practice and the artistic projects or programs that they are involved in during their co-op experience. In addition, students map the cultural assets of the geographical area where they are living on co-op to deepen their understanding of the surrounding communities through place-based learning. Students also have an opportunity to contribute to their art portfolio, develop basic grant-writing skills, and continue to develop their professional profile while reflecting on potential professional pathways or engaged communities of practice.

WORK 331 Sound, Sight, and Sentiment: Phenomenology of Place (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Fall Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least one prior Work Portfolio course at the 100/200-level or instructors permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

This 300-level work portfolio course is an opportunity for students to immerse in place— the work place, the temporary home place, the third space, and the places in between. It is an invitation to take to the underground, the sidewalks, and the streets in a phenomenological exploration of the teaming milieu of sights, sounds, and hyper-local sentiment experienced while on co-op. As a Work Portfolio, this course sees experience as text. Readings are chosen to inspire higher-level reflections on your daily lived experience in situ, and will be discussed during video chats which will be scheduled at a time convenient to all in the course. Assignments will be place vignettes, and can take the form of short written narratives or media productions, or media productions using digital tools (helpful for map-based productions or hosted intermedia). To begin, we explore how people move through place in a technology-saturated epoch where, for sure, the present is shot through with the past. Second, we become aware of the dominant sensory tendencies of our day, and consider nuancing the visual epistemologies of western thought in order to raise a greater awareness of the function of sound in society— embracing Jean Luc Nancy’s concept of the sonorous. Then we exercise our developing ability to think critically about culture through a documentation of experience in situ, resulting in rich media or long form narrative reflections on the sounds, sights, and pervading sentiments in the place that is your co-op.

WORK 350 Work Portfolio III (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Fall Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least one prior Work Portfolio course at the 100/200-level or instructors permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

This course engages students in reflection on their work experiences, expands their knowledge of diverse work environments, and encourages them to consider a variety of strategies for productive engagement in the workplace. Recognizing that their work situations are each different and complex, the course leads students to examine the language, people, tools, skills, activities, rules, and culture of the work communities in which they participate. The course leads students to consider their work in relation to the following contexts and themes: (1) the Personal Context of Work, (2) the Social Context of Work, and (3) the Global Context of Work.

WORK 390 Co-Constructed Learning in the Experiential Context (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Fall Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least one prior Work Portfolio course at the 100/200-level or instructors permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

The Co-Constructed course is based on traditions of democratic education and participatory learning, through which students establish habits of mind that empower them to exercise agency. It supports students as they pursue goals, projects and ideas that they find meaningful. In this course, students identify learning goals, action steps, benchmarks and modes of reflection within a well-considered learning contract at the beginning of the quarter. Throughout this course, students reflect upon their Integrative Learning in a learning log utilizing a variety of modes of reflection as determined and agreed upon in the learning contract. The learning log provides opportunity for both structured and unstructured writing and can include a variety of additional forms of self-reflection such as prose, poetry, sketching, photography of place, community mapping, blogging, etc. Cognitive, professional and personal prompts are provided for structured reflection in the learning log, should the student wish to utilize them.  Success is determined by the student and instructor together. Students evaluate their own learning based upon the completion of their goals, action steps, benchmarks and means of reflection articulated in the learning contract. Success is also determined by the depth of engaged reflection demonstrated in the learning log. The importance and integration of theory and praxis must be understood and accepted by the student in order for the Co-Constructed portfolio to be successful. The student should be self-directed, disciplined and able to accept the responsibility that comes with self-agency.

WORK 411 – The Art of the Working Artist and Creative Placemaking (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Summer Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least two prior Work Portfolio courses with one at the 300-level or instructor’s permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

In this course, co-op students explore the artist’s relationship to their practice, the arts-based workplace, and the surrounding community in which their work can be localized. Students examine their perspectives and purpose as an artist through an intersectional lens. By observing and contributing to an arts-based workplace, students explore how art and culture relate to lived experience, localized in diverse communities that are active sites of creative placemaking. As part of experiential place-based learning, students map the cultural assets in their surrounding geographical and cultural community to learn from local artists’ efforts and their relationship to art institutions and audiences. In addition, students have an opportunity to contribute to their art portfolio, craft an artist statement for a grant proposal or application to a graduate program, and refine their professional profile as a capstone project that highlights the achievements they have earned through engagement in the arts at Antioch.

WORK 425 Work Portfolio IV (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Summer Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least two prior Work Portfolio courses with one at the 300-level or instructor’s permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

This course is intended to promote student agency within the context of the Work Portfolio requirement. It is based on the belief that learning over co-op is maximized when students are encouraged to develop their own learning agenda and accomplish goals that they set for themselves. It is recognized that much can be attained by a student who engages in dialogue with their instructors, co-workers, supervisors, mentors, and other students, who can help them think about their work and how they hope to positions themselves for the future. Nevertheless, this course emphasizes the idea that the crucial factor in learning is student interest. By leading students to reflect on the themes that they most want to pursue, this course frames experiential learning as a co-constructed process that is realized through the empowerment of student agency and the promotion of engaged dialogue.

WORK 431 Humanities Fieldwork: Oral History & Digital Scholarship (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Summer Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least two prior Work Portfolio courses with one at the 300-level or instructor’s permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

This course guides students in collecting primary source material through direct investigation and observation that contributes to ongoing dialogue about the possibilities of human existence. It is an opportunity for students to conduct fieldwork while on co-op, in connection with a community partner in a distinct community setting. The course supports students who are actively developing their own research questions or documentary interests that may help form their senior project, and involves interviewing and curation of digital projects featuring those interviews within the context of a capstone oral history project. Oral History is generally defined as a methodology for conducting interviews, curating the result of those interviews, and making those interviews available for research, in accordance with the best practice guidelines established by the Oral History Association. Digital Scholarship is the process of using digital tools and platforms to investigate, arrange, and analyze oral histories, texts, data sets, and archival records. Humanities Fieldwork: Oral History & Digital Scholarship immerses students in best practices and tools for digital scholarship, while students conduct, process, interpret, and curate interviews conducted through fieldwork on co-op as their own independent research.

WORK 450 Work Portfolio IV: Cultural Immersion (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Summer Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least two prior Work Portfolio courses with one at the 300-level or instructor’s permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

This cultural immersion or international co-op experience places the student in an environment where learning is accomplished through active interaction with the people, languages, history, and institutions of other cultures. Students are expected to develop an understanding of social institutions and a view of the complexities and involved in any view of culture as a determinant of human actions, beliefs, and social attitudes. Through fulfilling this co-op students should demonstrate growth in their ability to understand and acknowledge cultural differences and to conceptually relate one’s own culture to another. If this co-op is also a target-language immersion experience, students should demonstrate greater facility in that language as measured by their associated language capstone.

WORK 475 Work Portfolio V (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Summer Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least two prior Work Portfolio courses with one at the 300-level or instructor’s permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

The cultural immersion co-op is a planned learning experience that places the learner in an environment where learning is accomplished through active interaction with the people, use of language, history, and institutions of other cultures. This course expects students to form a clear understanding and appreciation of common characteristics of another culture’s, peoples, and social institutions as well as their complexity and diversity. It allows the student to experience the power of culture as a determinant of human actions, beliefs, and interactions with the environment. Students should demonstrate growth in their ability to understand and acknowledge cultural differences and to conceptually relate one’s own culture to another. A signature assignment encourages the student to relate their experience in the cross-cultural setting to the attainment of their educational goals, in terms of language learning (if applicable), cultural understanding, and the understanding of the impact of one's own culture in the workplace.

WORK 481 Researching Cultures over Co-op: An Anthropological Approach (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Summer Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least two prior Work Portfolio courses with one at the 300-level or instructor’s permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

This course is intended to support students researching cultures, communities, societies, social groups/organizations, or institutions as a central component of their co-op experience. Using their specific co-op environments as field sites, students will develop a deeper understanding of the particular cultural contexts of their co-ops. The main goal is for students to use this research to create a writing sample suitable for graduate applications; the writing sample will be a formal research paper geared toward an academic audience in the social sciences. The course will guide students through sociocultural research in three main ways. It will introduce students to 1) fieldwork and data collection strategies, 2) methods for analyzing and synthesizing data, and 3) comparing and relating findings to existing literature and scholarship. The instructor will tailor the approach to each students’ research projects/co-op field sites. Students will have the opportunity to integrate and build on concepts from courses in anthropology, political economy, etc., and apply them to the research/writing sample. They will gain experience in fieldwork methods and concentrate on the art of writing a capstone academic research paper based on their fieldwork experience--skills that will significantly enhance their professional profiles and give their resumes a valuable edge.

WORK 482 Ecosociology: A Participatory Action Research Approach toward Environmental Justice (2 credits)

Offered once per year in the Summer Quarter; Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least two prior Work Portfolio courses with one at the 300-level or instructor’s permission; Co-requisite: Student must be engaged full-time (30 to 40 hours per week) in an approved co-op experience

What are we learning from each other as observers of and/or participants in the environmental justice movement? How are environmental activists in one part of the world benefiting from the experiences of those in other places? How can we increase the flow of ideas, strategies, and support systems in order to promote dialog beyond our particular local struggles? While recognizing our own privilege, how can we help ensure that activists who desire greater connectivity have opportunities to engage with one another across geocultural, linguistic, and political divide?. The purpose of this participatory action research course is to engage students as social researchers, thinkers, and activists who can facilitate dialog across cultural divides and help to link activist communities in various parts of the globe. It is intended to underscore the importance of translocal thinking, which is informed by awareness of and experience in the struggles of localized activist groups throughout the planet. The course will introduce students to a participatory action research model that is intended to help them engage with networks of activists, understand the social situations in which they exist, leverage emerging communications technologies, and amplify the voices of those working for environmental justice, and produce a capstone spoken-word advocacy project based on their research. Particular topics may include: harnessing the resources of educational institutions to increase translocal connectivity; sharing strategies for nonviolent social action toward environmental justice; promoting inclusiveness through community action and protest; and understanding the links between cultural sovereignty and environmental progress.