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Richard Kraince

Associate Professor of Cooperative Education
Dean of Cooperative, Experiential, and International Education

Contact Information

301 South Hall

Phone:
937-319-0095

Cell:
937-768-8042

E-mail:
rkraince@antiochcollege.edu

Richard Kraince is an associate professor of cooperative education as well as the Dean of Cooperative, Experiential, and International Education at Antioch College. He concentrates on the role of the university in social change both as a scholar and an educator. He conducts research on the relationships between social movements and educational reform internationally. He previously held posts as research professor of Southeast Asia studies and academic coordinator at El Colegio de México in Mexico City, where he taught graduate level courses on contemporary movements, social research methods, and the political sociology of Islam in Southeast Asia.

From 2003 to 2006, Dr. Kraince directed Ohio University’s Inter-Religious Dialogue Project. He previously served as a program officer with the Asia Foundation’s Islam and Civil Society program based in Jakarta. He conducted field research in Indonesia as a Foreign Language and Areas Studies grantee in 1998–99, a Fulbright Dissertation Research Program Fellow in 2000, and as a Fulbright New Century Scholar in 2005. He has also conducted educational research projects in Malaysia and southern Thailand. Richard has numerous years of experience leading experiential education programs in Southeast Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. He speaks English, Indonesian/Malay, and Spanish.

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D., Education, Ohio University

  • M.A., International Affairs—Southeast Asia Studies, Ohio University

  • M.A., Education, University of Rhode Island

  • B.S., Geology, Ohio University

COURSES

  • WORK 250 Work Portfolio II Welcome to the world of work in the early 21st Century. Students find themselves entering a global talent market shaped by massive demographic, economic, linguistic, and digital disruptions that are challenging long-held assumptions about nearly every aspect of modern life. They sense that they must develop different skills and capacities than those of previous generations in order to lead lives of significance and service in this emerging world. In addition to the deep content knowledge that has always been central to Antioch’s liberal arts approach, employers underscore the need to develop robust collaborative, communicative, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary capacities in order to collect data, communicate ideas, and test proposed solutions to problems in the workplace. This Work Portfolio course is designed to help students understand themselves as a "free agents" that are able to navigate the emerging employment landscape and develop the instincts necessary for productive engagement with people and organizations beyond the protected walls of higher education. The course engages students in purposeful observation, journal writing/ blogging, auto-ethnographic observation, reflection exercises, reading, and discussion forums designed to help them develop a considered relationship with your employer and the community they serve. It is intended to help students learn more about themselves, consider how they move through the world, and reflect on how their experience relates to their life goals. 

  • WORK 350 Work Portfolio III Section 4 This course engages students in reflection on their work experiences, expands their knowledge of diverse work environments, and encourages them to consider a variety of strategies for productive engagement in the workplace. Recognizing that their work situations are each different and complex, the course leads students to examine the language, people, tools, skills, activities, rules, and culture of the work communities in which they participate. The course leads students to consider their work in relation to the following contexts and themes: (1) the Personal Context of Work, (2) the Social Context of Work, and (3) the Global Context of Work.

  • WORK 425 Work Portfolio IV Section 2 This course is intended to promote student agency within the context of the Work Portfolio requirement. It is based on the belief that learning over co-op is maximized when students are encouraged to develop their own learning agenda and accomplish goals that they set for themselves. It is recognized that much can be attained by a student who engages in dialogue with their instructors, co-workers, supervisors, mentors, and other students, who can help them think about their work and how they hope to positions themselves for the future. Nevertheless, this course emphasizes the idea that the crucial factor in learning is student interest. By leading students to reflect on the themes that they most want to pursue, this course frames experiential learning as a co-constructed process that is realized through the empowerment of student agency and the promotion of engaged dialogue.

  • WORK 450 Work Portfolio IV: Cultural Immersion This cultural immersion or international co-op experience places the student in an environment where learning is accomplished through active interaction with the people, languages, history, and institutions of other cultures. Students are expected to develop an understanding of social institutions and a view of the complexities and involved in any view of culture as a determinant of human actions, beliefs, and social attitudes. Through fulfilling this co-op students should demonstrate growth in their ability to understand and acknowledge cultural differences and to conceptually relate one’s own culture to another. If this co-op is also a target-language immersion experience, students should demonstrate greater facility in that language as measured by their associated language capstone.

  • WORK 475 Work Portfolio V The cultural immersion co-op is a planned learning experience that places the learner in an environment where learning is accomplished through active interaction with the people, use of language, history, and institutions of other cultures. This course expects students to form a clear understanding and appreciation of common characteristics of another culture’s, peoples, and social institutions as well as their complexity and diversity. It allows the student to experience the power of culture as a determinant of human actions, beliefs, and interactions with the environment. Students should demonstrate growth in their ability to understand and acknowledge cultural differences and to conceptually relate one’s own culture to another. A signature assignment encourages the student to relate their experience in the cross-cultural setting to the attainment of their educational goals, in terms of language learning (if Curriculum Catalog 231 applicable), cultural understanding, and the understanding of the impact of one's own culture in the workplace.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • “Kraince, R. G. (2013). Revisitar el islam civil-democrático en los estados postautoritarios: lecciones del Movimiento Indonesia de Reforma. In El Fin de un Sueño Secular: Religión y Relaciones Internacionales en el Cambio de Siglo. Mexico City: El Colegio de México; pp. 129-153. ISBN: 978-607-462-424-3.

  • “Kraince, R. G. (2009). The Challenge to Religious Liberty in Indonesia. Washington DC: The Heritage Foundation; http://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg2279.cfm

  • “Kraince, R. G. (2009). Reforming Islamic Education in Malaysia: Doctrine or Dialogue. In R. W. Hefner (ed.) Making Modern Muslims: The Politics of Islamic Education in Southeast Asia. Mānoa, Hawai'i: University of Hawai'i Press; pp. 106-140. ISBN: 978-0-8248-3280-3.

  • “Kraince, R. G. (Spring 2008) Academic Freedom in Muslim Societies. International Higher Education, 51. ISSN: 1084-0613.

  • “Kraince, R. G. (September 2007). Islamic Higher Education and Social Cohesion in Indonesia. Prospects: Quarterly Review of Comparative Education, 37 (3), pp. 345-356. ISSN: 0033-1538 (print); ISSN: 1573-9090 (electronic).

  • “Heyneman, S. P., Kraince, R. G., Lesko, N. & Bastedo, M. (2007). Higher Education and Social Cohesion: A Comparative Perspective. In Higher Education in the New Century: Global Challenges and Innovative Ideas. P. Altbach & P. M. Peterson (Eds.). Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers (in Conjunction with UNESCO). ISBN: 978-90-8790-199-8.

  • “Kraince, R. G. (Producer), Sustikarini, A. (Associate Producer), Yadi, D. A. & Nugroho, S. (Directors) (2008). Conflict Management [film]. Available from Ohio University Center for International Studies (English version) or University of Indonesia, Faculty of Social and Political Science, Center for Research on Inter-group Conflict and Conflict Resolution (Indonesian version).

  • “Kraince, R. G. (Producer), Sustikarini, A. (Associate Producer), & Sijabat, S. H. D. (Director) (2007). Interfaith Dialogue [film]. Available from Ohio University Center for International Studies (English version) or University of Indonesia, Faculty of Social and Political Science, Center for Research on Inter-group Conflict and Conflict Resolution (Indonesian version).

  • “Kraince, R. G. (Producer), Sustikarini, A. (Associate Producer), & Yadi, D. A. (Director) (2007). Peer Mediation: School, a Reflection of the Community [film]. Available from Ohio University Center for International Studies (English version) or University of Indonesia, Faculty of Social and Political Science, Center for Research on Inter-group Conflict and Conflict Resolution (Indonesian version).