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Student Handbook

Updates to our new Student Handbook are in progress.

2014-2015 Student Handbook

 

Welcome to “Lines of Thinking”, a monthly feature from College President Tom Manley. Each installment will feature a poem selected for its powers to transport us to some higher, lower or common ground, and, possibly in the process, provide fresh perspective and insight on the ground we occupy daily.   

Here are three encounters with the American poet Allen Ginsberg; one of them explains the title I have given to this Lines of Thinking.

1.

Antioch College will host a five-day solar electric (photovoltaic) certification workshop, sponsored by Blue Rock Station, June 26-30, 2017, on the Antioch campus.

The course is designed to prepare attendees for employment in the solar industry, which is growing by 25 percent per year.

Sequence Changes

Sequence Changes and Optional Fifth Co-ops

Students have the right to petition the College in order to change or alter their study/co-op sequence. Considerable thought must be given to such a proposal because any sequence alteration may impact the student’s ability to fulfill graduation requirements on time. If a student perceives such a need, they should consult both their co-op and academic advisors in order to determine the feasibility of a change. If they have the support of both, they should send a letter to the Academic Policy and Review Committee (APRC) via the Registrar’s Office in which they outline their rationale for the sequence change, their plans for co-op, and what changes they will need to make on their degree plan. They should submit their revised degree plan along with support letters from both advisors in order to complete the proposal.

Students may also petition to enroll in an optional co-op term during the fall quarter of their fourth year of study. The approval of the fifth co-op is not automatic; it requires: 

  1. mandatory advising sessions and advanced planning;
  2. registration for an appropriate Work Portfolio course;
  3. evidence of good academic and community standing;
  4. completion of extra courses in the first three years of study, possibly leading to over-crediting situations; and
  5. permission of the student's classroom advisor, co-op advisor as well as the dean of cooperative, experiential, and international education.

Advanced planning is essential for students who wish to pursue an international co-op during their fifth co-op term. Students who wish to consider pursuing an international co-op opportunity should speak with their co-op advisor as far in advance as possible. While any student is welcome to propose an international co-ops, significantly higher priority is given to students on the three-year language track. Moreover, students are required to demonstrate that their language skills are appropriate for the proposed placement. Please note that language immersion/capstone co-ops are reserved for students who are committed to the three-year language track. These experiences require the approval of the Language and Culture Program.

The Co-op Experience

Integrative Learning

Cooperative Education faculty members develop mentored co-op experiences with partnering organizations—generally off campus—that allow students to test concepts and theory from the classroom through real-world engagement on problems in the professional realm. The overarching goals of the cooperative education program are to catalyze and steward integrative learning, which we define as the iterative process through which students make connections between core disciplinary knowledge learned in the classroom and their experiences in the settings where they engage with the world.

At the core of the Co-op experience is professional engagement—meaningful work in challenging settings where students generally can expect reasonable compensation for their contributions. During their cooperative work terms, students take on a fulltime job or engage in another significant experiential endeavor for a minimum of thirty hours per week throughout the duration of an eleven-week term. Although paid employment is Co-op’s stock-in-trade, the program is committed to broadening conceptions of the experience in response to changes in the global economy as well as the interests of the current generation of students.

At Antioch, student agency matters!

The Co-op faculty recognizes that a significant number of students hope to use one or more of their cooperative work terms to pursue entrepreneurial opportunities with start-up firms, conduct research related to their majors, engage in artistic productions, position themselves for graduate study through special projects, or experiment with their own professional pursuits. It also understands that some students are interested in proposing a co-op job of their own design in order to pursue their unique ambitions, take advantage of special opportunities, or simply develop a stronger sense of their own agency.

For these reasons, by formal petition to the dean of cooperative, experiential, and international education, students may seek approval to substitute a cooperative education employment opportunity with a self-selected, paid or unpaid internship; a research appointment; or other academically or professionally significant experience that fulfill their own ambitions for learning off-campus as well as the College's work requirement.

Whatever objectives a student pursues, it is their integrative learning that is emphasized.  The common thread that provides cohesion throughout and across the wide variety of co-op experiences on offer is the Work Portfolio coursework that students take concurrently when they are engaged in the field. Their reflection assignments are commonly published in Antioch Engaged, our journal of social practice and professional engagement. Please visit this site to see how current students are engaging the world.

The Co-op Experience

Integrative Learning

Cooperative Education faculty members develop mentored co-op experiences with partnering organizations—generally off campus—that allow students to test concepts and theory from the classroom through real-world engagement on problems in the professional realm. The overarching goals of the cooperative education program are to catalyze and steward integrative learning, which we define as the iterative process through which students make connections between core disciplinary knowledge learned in the classroom and their experiences in the settings where they engage with the world.

At the core of the Co-op experience is professional engagement—meaningful work in challenging settings where students generally can expect reasonable compensation for their contributions. During their cooperative work terms, students take on a fulltime job or engage in another significant experiential endeavor for a minimum of thirty hours per week throughout the duration of an eleven-week term. Although paid employment is Co-op’s stock-in-trade, the program is committed to broadening conceptions of the experience in response to changes in the global economy as well as the interests of the current generation of students.

At Antioch, student agency matters!

The Co-op faculty recognizes that a significant number of students hope to use one or more of their cooperative work terms to pursue entrepreneurial opportunities with start-up firms, conduct research related to their majors, engage in artistic productions, position themselves for graduate study through special projects, or experiment with their own professional pursuits. It also understands that some students are interested in proposing a co-op job of their own design in order to pursue their unique ambitions, take advantage of special opportunities, or simply develop a stronger sense of their own agency.

For these reasons, by formal petition to the dean of cooperative, experiential, and international education, students may seek approval to substitute a cooperative education employment opportunity with a self-selected, paid or unpaid internship; a research appointment; or other academically or professionally significant experience that fulfill their own ambitions for learning off-campus as well as the College's work requirement.

Whatever objectives a student pursues, it is their integrative learning that is emphasized.  The common thread that provides cohesion throughout and across the wide variety of co-op experiences on offer is the Work Portfolio coursework that students take concurrently when they are engaged in the field. Their reflection assignments are commonly published in Antioch Engaged, our journal of social practice and professional engagement. Please visit this site to see how current students are engaging the world.

Several slices of Japanese culture are on their way back to Antioch College and Yellow Springs.

Ohayo Ohio, a nine-day Japanese symposium and cultural event, takes place at various sites at Antioch College and throughout Yellow Springs May 18-26, 2017. A variety of workshops, presentations and exhibits on traditional and contemporary Japanese art, culture and language will be offered. “We have added several unique events spotlighting contemporary Japanese arts and culture,” said Caitlin Meagher, Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology and one of the organizers of the event.  

There are events for families as well as experienced artists. Free events include a gallery talk by photojournalist Everett Brown; Japanese storytelling by former Antioch professor Harold Wright and his wife Jonatha; an exhibition of current Japanese Antioch students and one recent alumna of their photographic images of Japan at the Emporium and Underdog Café, a Japanese calligraphy demonstration and workshop; and a koto (Japanese harp) performance.

Workshops will include arts such as raku (pottery firing), washi (paper making) with MacArthur Fellow Timothy Barrett ’73, bento box preparation, and shibori (cloth-dyeing techniques). These workshops have limited space and require pre-registration and pre-payment.

Antioch College and the Village of Yellow Springs enjoy a long and storied connection with Japan. The Village welcomed and sponsored families from internment camps during World War II, Antioch professor Earle Reynolds served on the U.S. Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in Hiroshima after the war (which led to the founding of the World Friendship Center), and Antioch professor Harold Wright established of the College’s exchange program with Kyoto Seika University. Reflecting this strong legacy, Japanese is one of three languages offered at Antioch College.

Ohayo Ohio is generously supported by the Japan Foundation and the Yellow Springs Community Foundation.

The current schedule of events is as follows:

Thurs., May 18, 7:30 – 9 pm: Sake tastings and opening of student photo exhibition

Emporium Wines and the Underdog Café, 233 Xenia Ave.

Fri, May 19, 6:30 pm: Harmony of Japan choral concert and discussion

Antioch College, Herndon Gallery (South Hall)

Sat., May 20, 3 pm: Shibori workshop with Jackie Muhall and Shannon Hart ‘17

Antioch College, Arts & Science Building

Sat., May 20, 7 pm: Everett Kennedy Brown gallery talk and exhibition

Antioch College, Herndon Gallery (South Hall)

Sun., May 21, 11 am: Lauren and Kazuko Heaton, healthy bento workshop

Antioch College, North Hall

Sun., May 21, 2-4 pm: Harold and Jonatha Wright, storytelling

Antioch College, Herndon Gallery (South Hall)

Wed., May 24 9 am - 3 pm: Tim Barrett, washi papermaking workshop

Antioch College, Arts and Science Building Room 107

Thurs., May 25, 5 pm: Tomoko Hetherington, shodo calligraphy workshop

Antioch College, Herndon Gallery (South Hall)

Fri., May 26, 10 am-2 pm: Todd Hickerson, raku pottery workshop

John Bryan Community Pottery, 100 Dayton St.

Fri., May 26, 7 pm: Gai Koto Jin, koto performance and education

Antioch College, Herndon Gallery (South Hall)

Ohayo Ohio continues in November with a symposium on the film Orizuru , which tells the story behind Sadako and the Paper Cranes and the bombing of Hiroshima. Abel Coehlo, butoh performer, and Dr. Julie Iezzi, theatre professor and kyogen performer, will offer a variety of workshops and performances.

For pre-registration, please visit brownpapertickets.com (search under Ohaya Ohio).  For more information, please see Ohayo Ohio’s Facebook page or contact Caitlin Meagher at cmeagher@antiochcollege.edu 

 

(Yellow Springs, OH) By any measure, the Coretta Scott King Center’s first external friend-raiser was a big success.

Antioch College congratulates students David Blakeslee ’18, Ellie Burck ’18, Lillian Burke ’16, Odette Chavez-Mayo ’18, and Charlotte Norman ’18, Assistant Professor of Media Arts Charles Fairbanks and Arts Studio Coordinator Forrest Bright for receiving the Young Grit Award for best student film this weekend at the Indie Grits Film Festival in Columbia, SC.

Antioch College proudly salutes its alumni and friends during National Volunteer Week 2017.

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